Alba Corral

About the Artist

 Alba G. Corral (b.1977 – Madrid) is a Visual Artist and creative coder based in Barcelona. With a background in computer engineering, Corral has been creating generative art using software and coding for the past decade. Her practice spans across live performance, video, digital media and installation, exploring abstract narratives and expressing sensitivity and taste for color. By combining generative systems with improvised drawing techniques, her digital language becomes organic, creating mesmerizing digital landscapes. Corral is known for her stunning live audio-visual performances where she integrates real-time coding and drawing in collaboration with musicians.  Her works has been exhibited at festivals and events in Europe, Mexico, Japan & USA.

In the framework of teaching teaches visual programming focused on designers and artists in different spaces in talks, workshops and workshops. Dedicated to the creative code with free software tools (Processing).

She is a curator at the Eufònic festival.  Her website is at albagcorral.com.

Press

 

    

Walking into the intimate elegance of the Generative Art Project on East Sixth, you could convince yourself that you’ve entered a small transtemporal outpost of the Tyrell Corporation. Not because there are any replicants in attendance (although, who knows, because nascent tech may one day render humanoids as authentic, intelligent, and welcoming as the gallery’s curator, Julia Morton), but because there are several big screens alive with patterns, like machine sentience made visual.

Right now, those screens are displaying the works of Alba Corral, a Barcelona-based artist. Between the screens and their kinetic visuals are framed static prints of … outtakes? Of screenshots? Of distinct moments, let’s say, from the recorded digital dance of lines, shapes, and colors that the performative Corral has choreographed – has improvised via command-line code, often while onstage and responding to live music.

“This visual control is a testament to Corral’s creative talent, coding skills, and technical knowledge of the rapidly evolving generative art movement,” says the gallery statement for this latest show. And the Generative Art Project itself – open since September, run by curator Morton and her data-sculpting husband, James Pricer – is a testament to the beauty and layers of meaning possible within this relatively new art form.

Some of the work displayed at the G.A.P., Corral’s especially, is highly ornamental, comprising what a dubious wag might dismiss as glorified screensavers. But, you know, there’s a difference between the swaths of cheap wallpaper you can buy at Walmart and examples of printed masterworks by the legendary William Morris. And none of that stuff, the ridiculous or the sublime, was quite so engaged with by the artist – bit by bit, byte by byte, pixel by panorama, to blossom like shattered flowers growing and glowing across a liquid crystal field. We continue to revere, almost as routine, old-school abstractions in paint by the likes of Mondrian and Frankenthaler and Stella; how can similar present-day expressions that shift and shimmer before our pattern-hungry eyes be any less worthy of time and attention?

Also, there’s denial.of.service – not the systems assault, but the digital artist who goes by that name: a man whose video works are enhanced by, sometimes predicated on, visualizations of data relevant to the subjects or themes he’s exploring. You want Deeper Meanings in your generative art, citizen? Morton will be glad to share some denial.of.service projects with you, vivid evocations of alienation or desire or suffering that are ornamental only in the way that Picasso’s Guernica was ornamental.

We’re trying so hard not to use the phrase “cutting edge” in this review that we’re about to sprain something. But please know that whether you’re looking for exactly that sort of a visual-arts experience or just wanting to enjoy professionally rendered beauty that moves and can move you, Austin’s Generative Art Project is a good place to go.

 

 

Videos

Videos are delivered via USB thumb drive with a Certificate of Authenticity signed by the artist and the gallery.  For delivery outside the U.S. please contact the Project at the email or phone below.

Prints

Prints are delivered on paper, canvas, metal, or plexiglass with a Certificate of Authenticity signed by the artist and the gallery.  For delivery outside the U.S. please contact the Project at the email or phone below. 

Please contact the Project to acquire Alba’s artwork in formats and sizes different from the ones above.

email:  Julia.Morton@GenerativeArtProject.com

phone: +1 917.523.1512

Regards,

Julia Morton

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